Living with adhd spouse and child

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living with adhd spouse and child

The ADHD Effect on Marriage: Understand and Rebuild Your Relationship in Six Steps by Melissa Orlov

An invaluable resource for couples in which one or both partners have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), this authoritative book guides troubled partners towards an understanding and appreciation for the struggles and triumphs of a relationship affected by it, and to integrate ADHD into their relationship in a more positive and less disruptive way. Going beyond traditional marriage counseling which can often discount the influence of ADHD, this discussion offers advice from the authors personal experience and years of research and identifies patterns of behavior that can hurt marriages—such as nagging, intimacy problems, sudden anger, and memory issues—through the use of descriptions of actual couples and their ADHD struggles and solutions. The first third of the book is dedicated to helping couples identify how ADHD impacts their relationship. The last two-thirds provides a specific set of steps couples can move through to overcome their hurt and anger, once again develop loving ways to interact with each other, and find the joy they’ve lost in their struggles. This book encourages both spouses to become active partners in improving their relationship and healing the fissures that ADHD can cause. Also included are worksheets and various methods for difficult conversations so that couples can find a technique that fits their unique relationship and improve their communication skills.
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Published 02.10.2019

ADHD in Children (Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder)

But love is not lost! Rebuild trust in your marriage with these tips.
Melissa Orlov

Adult ADHD and Relationships

While the distractibility, disorganization, and impulsivity of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ADHD or ADD can cause problems in many areas of adult life, these symptoms can be particularly damaging when it comes to your closest relationships. This is especially true if the symptoms of ADHD have never been properly diagnosed or treated. No matter what you do, nothing seems to please your spouse or partner. You wish your significant other could relax even a little bit and stop trying to control every aspect of your life. You wonder what happened to the person you fell in love with. The non-ADHD partner complains, nags, and becomes increasingly resentful while the ADHD partner, feeling judged and misunderstood, gets defensive and pulls away. In the end, nobody is happy.

How does ADHD or ADD affect relationships?

You can barely talk to each other about problems affecting the relationship. When you do, you rarely agree. ADHD can be a contributing factor in a wide range of relationship problems. If your partner has ADD, you may feel ignored and lonely. Your partner can focus on things that interest him, but not on you. He never seems to follow through on what he agrees to do.

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3 COMMENTS

  1. Agape R. says:

    Getting married usually means you have a partner in life.

  2. Darwin R. says:

    Marriages affected by ADHD, like all marriages, range from highly successful to completely disastrous.

  3. Sabine P. says:

    Attention Disorders Can Take a Toll on Marriage - The New York Times

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