Infant toddler environment rating scale score sheet

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infant toddler environment rating scale score sheet

Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale (Iters-R): Revised Edition by Thelma Harms

Designed for use in center-based child care programs for infants and toddlers up to 30 months of age, the Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale(R), ITERS-R, can be used by program directors for supervision and program improvement, by teaching staff for self-assessment, by agency staff for monitoring, and in teacher training programs. The established reliability and validity of the scale make it particularly useful for research and program evaluation.

Featuring a spiral binding, the updated ITERS-R offers more practical assistance in the form of additional notes for clarification and an Expanded Scoresheet, which incorporates notes and tables to assist in scoring. However, the items and indicators remain the same as in the original ITERS-R.

Convenient organization in seven subscales:


Space and Furnishings Personal Care Routines Listening and Talking Activities Interaction Program Structure Parents and Staff Each of the 39 Items is expressed as a 7-point scale with indicators for 1 (inadequate), 3 (minimal), 5 (good), and 7 (excellent). Notes for clarification and questions are included for selected Items.

An introductory section gives detailed information about the rationale of the ITERS-R, the process of revision, and the reliability and validity of the scale. Full instructions for administration and scoring, as well as a Scoresheet and Profile that may be photocopied, are included with the scale.
File Name: infant toddler environment rating scale score sheet.zip
Size: 84607 Kb
Published 12.07.2019

ECERS 3 Scoring narrated 3 31

All About the ITERS-Rô Set

Basic needs of children include:. Note: During the observation, the assessor is not allowed to interact with the provider or children. In addition, please note that you will not receive the results on the actual assessment day. Ratings are based on levels of quality. When scoring, each section builds onto the next.

There are no immediate plans for child care programs completing North Carolina's Environment Rating Scale assessment process to transition to either of these new editions. Assessment brochure. Scheduling brochure. One form should be used for each classroom that includes more than one child. Describes many of the health and sanitation practices considered during the assessment process. These standards apply to all gross motor equipment and materials. Addresses common questions and scoring issues related to gross motor spaces and play that occur during the assessments completed by NCRLAP.

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Featuring a new spiral binding, the updated ITERS-R offers more practical assistance in the form of additional notes for clar Add to cart. Add to Wishlist. Add to Compare. Save shipping on orders under Contact us for special pricing on bulk quantities and large ticket items. We will meet or beat competitors pricing if possible.

This revised version offers practical assistance in the form of Notes for Clarification and an Expanded Score Sheet to simplify scoring. The items and indicators are the same as in the original version. Assess the quality of infant and toddler classrooms and enhance program development with charts detailing levels of quality from inadequate to excellent. Explanatory notes appear on facing pages. Click here for Online Training. Debby Cryer, Ph. She has taught in a variety of early childhood programs, recently directed the child care program at the FPG Center, and has studied and written about early childhood program quality for more than twenty years.

The Environment Rating Scales are used for many different purposes within the field of early childhood care and education. They are used worldwide for conducting research and monitoring quality assessment and improvement in learning environments. Debby Cryer, Ph. She has taught in a variety of early childhood programs, recently directed the child care program at the FPG Center, and has studied and written about early childhood program quality for more than twenty years. Throughout her career, she has combined her interests as an early childhood practitioner with those of a researcher, studying real-world issues and translating research findings into practice for early childhood program staff, parents, and policy makers. She is currently Principal Investigator of two studies investigating the effects of continuity of caregivers on infants and toddlers in child care. Thelma Harms, Ph.

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