Looking for the lost gods of england

8.32  ·  3,832 ratings  ·  923 reviews
looking for the lost gods of england

The Lost Gods of England by Brian Branston

This 1976 book is, as far as my experience stretches, the daddy of them all. Its been cited as a source in probably every other thing Ive read on Anglo-Saxon (and by association/implication Norse) mythology, but you dont see it in bookshops any more.

Actually, having read a reasonable amount of other stuff, I didnt find much in this, the original, that hadnt been taken for granted and reissued in all the other books thatve been written since. But its good to have peeled back a layer and read this for myself.



Its rather an individual and subjective read. The authors voice is very prominent, falling somewhere between professorial, conversational and verbose. He analyses the material, but -- this often being slender -- the conclusions are necessarily personal. He is more discerning than some (amateur) historians can be and doesnt stretch everything beyond its credibility, but it might require a rather sympathetic view to share his conclusions.



I think I detect, between the lines, a proto-neo-pagan(!) seeking lore and information to support an inclination not just away from soulless modernity but towards a reverence for the Earth. There is mercifully no Anglo-Saxon Volkisch tendency here, and anyone looking to support a race-specific and exclusive Theodism would be (further) wasting their time reading this book.



--Osric of Ossulston.
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Published 01.02.2019

DOCUMENTARY NEW HISTORY of The Lost Gods of Easter Island

This is a short book, with 45 pages listed before the appendices. It is an introduction to the scant available literature which historically links the culture and.
Brian Branston

Looking For the Lost Gods Of England

An examination of the royal genealogies, charms, verse and other sources in an attempt to find the names and attributes of the gods and goddesses of the early Anglo-Saxons. The text is a transcript of a talk given to a meeting of The English Companions. Convert currency. Add to Basket. Book Description Anglo-Saxon Books. Condition: New. Dimension: x x 4.

This book is a collection of research done by the author on the heathen practises of England, showing the worship of Gods and Goddesses such as the Earth Mother, Nerthus. She examines many old documents to discover the clues to the pre-Christian Gods and Goddesses in royal genealogy, charms and poetry. She also examines place names in England today which hint at their connection to a time when England had more than just the Christian God! In addition the book also includes a Pagan Calendar based on the dates of Old English festivals and observances; there is a collection of songs and dances which can be used in Spring and Summer rituals, a glossary of place names and many maps illustration the distribution of people, places, poems, stories and both Old England The land of Engle and England in the late 5th century. An excellent and well researched book, recommended to all of you looking to include the Gods of England in your own practises, or who are simply curious and wants to find out more. You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account.

An examination of the royal genealogies, charms, verse and other sources in an attempt to find the names and attributes of the gods and goddesses of the early Anglo-Saxons. The text is a transcript of a talk given to a meeting of The English Companions. Toggle Dropdown Advanced Search. Status Available. Call number Collection Your library. Publication Anglo-Saxon Books , Paperback, 52 pages.

Looking for the Lost Gods of England book. Read 17 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The earliest account of English heathen practi.
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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…., So I decided to look for non-Scandinavian sources about the prechristian faith, since I want to learn more about the faith of the region that I live in. There appears to be quite some books about Anglo-Saxon heathenry and this book has a very promising title.

Interesting but very thin booklet containing the report of a search within Anglo-Saxon writings for the original Anglo-Saxon deities and customs. The author uses several sources: mythical ancestry of Looking for the Lost Gods of England. Kathleen Herbert. The earliest account of English heathen practices reveals that they worshipped the Earth Mother and called her Nerthus.

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