Henry viii king and court alison weir

5.20  ·  4,141 ratings  ·  662 reviews
henry viii king and court alison weir

Henry VIII: The King and His Court by Alison Weir

“WEIR’S BOOK OUTSHINES ALL PREVIOUS STUDIES OF HENRY. Beautifully written, exhaustive in its research, it is a gem. . . . She succeeds masterfully in making Henry and his six wives . . . come alive for the reader.”–Philadelphia InquirerHenry VIII, renowned for his command of power and celebrated for his intellect, presided over one of the most magnificent–and dangerous–courts in Renaissance Europe. Never before has a detailed, personal biography of this charismatic monarch been set against the cultural, social, and political background of his glittering court. Now Alison Weir, author of the finest royal chronicles of our time, brings to vibrant life the turbulent, complex figure of the King. Packed with colorful description, meticulous in historical detail, rich in pageantry, intrigue, passion, and luxury, Weir brilliantly renders King Henry VIII, his court, and the fascinating men and women who vied for its pleasures and rewards. The result is an absolutely spellbinding read.
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Published 16.12.2018

Alison Weir introduces her Anne Boleyn novel from her Six Tudor Queens series

Henry VIII: The King and His Court

There were some very interesting details about Henry's life and I have a new "visual" of him. This book has its weaknesses, the lack of a coherent thread to its account early on being one of them. But the level of detail and depth of research shown more than make up for that. And the subject Writer Alison Weir received training to be a teacher with a concentration in history from the North Western Polytechnic. Before becoming a full-time writer, she worked as a civil servant and ran her own school for children with learning difficulties from to

An entertaining narrative packed with colourful description and a wealth of anecdotal evidence, but a comprehensive analytical study of the development of both monarch and court during a crucial period in English history.
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Charles Laughton is a common choice, but I have a weakness for Sid James in Carry on Henry, with Barbara Windsor on top form in every sense as one of the Duke of Bristol's pair of daughters. The film is a worthy distillation of the cheerful misinformation about Great Harry that clog-dances around the English subconscious; it also judiciously celebrates the fact that the Tudor Stalin can no longer do us harm. While Henry lived, it was not a good idea to laugh at him, since one of his more long-lasting acts was to extend the definition of treason: merely to say something rude about the king could be treason, as much as actual rebellion. The Tudor public was by no means entirely cowed. It is said that while Henry was upsetting all Europe in his frantic efforts to end marriage number one, the women of England took Katherine of Aragon's side, while the men argued for Anne Boleyn naturally, in a male-chauvinist age, the men won. Likewise, it became apparent that Henry's greed had caused a catastrophic debasement of England's silver coinage: the coins started revealing their base-metal content, first in the most prominent feature of the royal portrait.

There were some very interesting details about Henry's life and I have a new "visual" of him. This book has its weaknesses, the lack of a coherent thread to its account early on being one of them. But the level of detail and depth of research shown more than make up for that. And the subject Alison Weir. How does the adulation the young King initially inspired of the court compare to the subsequent attitudes his courtiers held toward him? In which ways was he burdened by unrealistic expectations?

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