Haiti and dominican republic an island divided summary

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haiti and dominican republic an island divided summary

Why the Cocks Fight: Dominicans, Haitians, and the Struggle for Hispaniola by Michele Wucker

Like two roosters in a fighting arena, Haiti and the Dominican Republic are encircled by barriers of geography and poverty. They co-inhabit the Caribbean island of Hispaniola, but their histories are as deeply divided as their cultures: one French-speaking and black, one Spanish-speaking and mulatto. Yet, despite their antagonism, the two countries share a national symbol in the rooster--and a fundamental activity and favorite sport in the cockfight. In this book, Michele Wucker asks: If the symbols that dominate a culture accurately express a nations character, what kind of a country draws so heavily on images of cockfighting and roosters, birds bred to be aggressive? What does it mean when not one but two countries that are neighbors choose these symbols? Why do the cocks fight, and why do humans watch and glorify them?

Wucker studies the cockfight ritual in considerable detail, focusing as much on the customs and histories of these two nations as on their contemporary lifestyles and politics. Her well-cited and comprehensive volume also explores the relations of each nation toward the United States, which twice invaded both Haiti (in 1915 and 1994) and the Dominican Republic (in 1916 and 1965) during the twentieth century. Just as the owners of gamecocks contrive battles between their birds as a way of playing out human conflicts, Wucker argues, Haitian and Dominican leaders often stir up nationalist disputes and exaggerate their cultural and racial differences as a way of deflecting other kinds of turmoil. Thus Why the Cocks Fight highlights the factors in Caribbean history that still affect Hispaniola today, including the often contradictory policies of the U.S.
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Why Dominican Republic Hates Haiti

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Airs Tuesday, April 19, at 9 p. View a timeline of key events in Haiti and the Dominican Republic history. He introduces viewers to the faces and voices of the descendants of the Africans in six Latin-American countries, who created these worlds. He shows the similarities and distinctions between these cultures and how the New-World manifestations are rooted in, but distinct from, their African antecedents. A quest he began 12 years ago with "Wonders Of The African World" comes full circle in "Black In Latin America," an effort to discover how Africa and Europe combined to create the vibrant cultures of Latin America, with a rich legacy of thoughtful, articulate subjects whose stories are astonishingly moving and irresistibly compelling. In Haiti, Professor Gates tells the story of the birth of the first-ever black republic, and finds out how the slaves' hard fought liberation over Napoleon Bonaparte's French Empire became a double-edged sword. Watch the full episode.

We use cookies to improve our service for you. You can find more information in our data protection declaration. They might share an island, but the Dominican Republic and Haiti couldn't be more different. While the former is a popular tourist destinations in the Caribbean, Haiti is one of the poorest countries in the world. Palm trees, sandy beaches stretching for miles, a brilliant blue sea — at first glance, the Dominican Republic seems like a real paradise. Several million tourists visit the country each year. But the stunning landscape and the luxurious hotels mask the fact that the Dominican Republic actually belongs to the less wealthy countries in Latin America, and that it shares a border with Haiti, the poorest country in the western world.

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In a million years, I would never have thought to teach young students about their African heritage—especially as a white teacher. From other students, particularly from Mexico or Central and South America , one can notice the strong indigenous nature of their complexion. Yet when this racial complexity is noted and explained by me, even as someone of Hispanic origin myself, it is met with pushback, denial and outright hostility. The former statement, by the way, is from a student whose skin is darker than that of the Black students in our school. Yesterday, I saw the first part of a 4-part PBS documentary that helped shed light on the complex nature of race in Latin America.

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