John adams mother and father

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john adams mother and father

John Quincy Adams: Militant Spirit by James Traub

John Quincy Adams was the last of his kind—a Puritan from the age of the Founders who despised party and compromise, yet dedicated himself to politics and government. The son of John Adams, he was a brilliant ambassador and secretary of state, a frustrated president at a historic turning point in American politics, and a dedicated congressman for eighteen years who collapsed on the floor of the House of Representatives in the midst of an impassioned political debate. He died two days later at the age of 80.

In John Quincy Adams, scholar and journalist James Traub draws on Adams’ diary, letters, and writings to evoke a diplomat and president whose ideas remain with us today. Adams was a fierce nationalist who, as secretary of state, championed the idea of American expansion. Yet, at the same time he warned against moralistic and militaristic policies abroad—a chastening wisdom that makes him the father of what we now call “realism” in foreign policy. As president, he was a bold proponent of the idea of activist government later brought to fruition by Abraham Lincoln and others.

Adams’ numerous achievements—and equally numerous failures—stand as testaments to his unwavering moral convictions. A man who refused to take refuge in the politically prudent course of action, Adams was repudiated by his own Federalist party and, as president, by the nation that voted him out of office. And yet, in the final decade of his life, Adams regained the country’s regard, and even reverence, for as a congressman he often stood alone against the forces of slavery, twice beating back motions of censure. John Quincy Adams tells the story of this brilliant, flinty, and unyielding man whose life exemplified political courage—a life against which each of us might measure our own.
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John Adams (b. 1947) - Naive and Sentimental Music

Biography of John Adams

He was a Congregationalist minister. She was the daughter of John Quincy, a member of the colonial Governor's council and colonel of the militia. Quincy was also Speaker of the Massachusetts Assembly, a post he held for 40 years until his death at age He died in ; three years into his granddaughter Abigail Smith's marriage to John Adams, and his interest in government and his career in public service influenced her. One of her great-great-great-great grandmothers came from a Welsh family.

Abigail Adams gave birth to six children, three daughters and three sons, four of whom would live to adulthood. The other three lived ordinary lives in what has come to be regarded as an extraordinary family. As the sole daughter, Nabby was her mother's constant companion during her father's and brothers' extended absences from their farm in Braintree, Massachusetts, Sister Susanna, born in , would die at just over a year. In , on John Quincy's 10th birthday, Abigail delivered a stillborn girl, Elizabeth. John missed Nabby's teen years while on a diplomatic mission to France during the Revolutionary War.

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Biography of John Adams Childhood "He means well for his country, is always an honest man, often a wise man, but sometimes, and in some things, absolutely out of his senses. John was named after his father, a deacon of the church. - His early years were spent living alternately in Braintree and Boston, and his doting father and affectionate mother taught him mathematics, languages, and the classics. His father, John Adams, had been politically active for all of John Quincy's life, but the calling of the First Continental Congress in marked a new stage in John Adams' activism.

Born into a comfortable, but not wealthy, Massachusetts farming family on October 30, , John Adams grew up in the tidy little world of New England village life. His father, a deacon in the Congregational Church, earned a living as a farmer and shoemaker in Braintree, roughly fifteen miles south of Boston. As a healthy young boy, John loved the outdoors, frequently skipping school to hunt and fish. He said later that he would have preferred a life as a farmer, but his father insisted that he receive a formal education. His father hoped that he might become a clergyman. John attended a dame school, a local school taught by a female teacher that was designed to teach the rudimentary skills of reading and writing, followed by a Latin school, a preparatory school for those who planned to attend college. He eventually excelled at his studies and entered Harvard College at age fifteen.

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