Book we need to talk about kevin review

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book we need to talk about kevin review

We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver

The gripping international bestseller about motherhood gone awry.

Eva never really wanted to be a mother - and certainly not the mother of the unlovable boy who murdered seven of his fellow high school students, a cafeteria worker, and a much-adored teacher who tried to befriend him, all two days before his sixteenth birthday. Now, two years later, it is time for her to come to terms with marriage, career, family, parenthood, and Kevins horrific rampage in a series of startlingly direct correspondences with her estranged husband, Franklin. Uneasy with the sacrifices and social demotion of motherhood from the start, Eva fears that her alarming dislike for her own son may be responsible for driving him so nihilistically off the rails.

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We Need to Talk About Kevin by Lionel Shriver - Review

Goings on About Town

Books seldom feel as contemporary as this one. Set against the farce of the counting of the votes in the US presidential elections, We Need To Talk About Kevin tells the story of a high-school massacre, similar to that at Columbine. And it asks the question all America has asked itself: why? However, it is not the novel's ostensible subject matter that has made it an underground success in the US. Told through letters from the killer's mother, Eva, to her absent husband, Franklin, the book explores the trials of maternity and the traumatic impact it can have on a marriage.

Thank you! Two years earlier, when he was not quite 16, Kevin Khatchadourian went on a murderous rampage and now lives in a juvenile facility, where his mother Eva visits him regularly if joylessly. Is she a bad mother? Is he a devil child? The implied answer to both is yes. Eva and her husband Franklin were happily married until she became pregnant in her late 30s. The successful publisher of bohemian travel guides who loves her work, Eva is more ambivalent than Franklin about the prospect of parenthood.

A dark, witty tale of guilt and redemption

A starred or boxed review indicates a book of outstanding quality. - Eva never really wanted to be a mother - and certainly not the mother of the unlovable boy who murdered seven of his fellow high school students, a cafeteria worker, and a much-adored teacher who tried to befriend him, all two days before his sixteenth birthday. Now, two years later, it is time for her to co.

I've been holding off on watching a screener copy ever since I decided to review the book for Badass Digest. It turns out that Siberia doesn't have much in the way of nightlife and those Wakefield fuckers sure as hell don't help. I have no idea what has made it into the film, so if I belabor a point that never makes it into the movie, I apologize in advance. Also, you guys all know this is a book about a kid who commits a mass murder at his school, right? I only ask because my boyfriend told me this weekend that the reason he'd never read the book was that he assumed it was a heartwarming tale about a mother's love for her autistic son. No autism. Lots of murderin', though!

Kevin is a mass-murderer: a boy who, shortly before his 16th birthday, kills seven classmates, a teacher and a school cafeteria worker. The "we" are, ostensibly, his mother Eva - the narrator of this acutely shocking and profoundly intelligent epistolary novel by an American woman writer - and his father Franklin, the estranged husband to whom her letters are addressed. In these letters, Eva explores the background to, and ramifications of, her son's killing spree. She does so in a way almost entirely devoid of self-pity, dispassionately analytical and inexorably honest. Here she is dissecting one bereaved mother's decision to sue her for negligence: "I fear that Mary's Somehow Mary seemed confused as to what the problem was. The problem was not who was punished for what.

It is written from the first person perspective of the teenage killer's mother, Eva Khatchadourian, and documents her attempt to come to terms with her son Kevin and the murders he committed, as told in a series of letters from Eva to her husband. The novel, Shriver's 7th, won the Orange Prize , a U. In the novel was adapted into a film. In the wake of a school massacre by Kevin, the year-old son of Franklin Plaskett and Eva Khatchadourian, Eva writes letters to Franklin. In these letters, she relates the history of her relationship with her husband, and the events of Kevin's life up to the killings, and her thoughts concerning their relationship. She also reveals events that she tried to keep secret, such as when she lashed out and broke Kevin's arm in a sudden fit of rage.

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