One mans war a novel

5.73  ·  6,696 ratings  ·  819 reviews
one mans war a novel

One Mans War by Paul Strathern

1917

Private Strang is fighting for survival in the trenches of France.

As a young man he is finding it hard to adapt to a life where his sole purpose is to inflict death upon an unseen enemy.

He thinks his struggles are all over when he is shot in the neck and is sent from the trenches to a field hospital.

But his injury isn’t the end of the war for Strang.

After been caught in flagrante delicto with a nurse by a group of advancing Germans, Strang is mistaken for an intelligence asset and imprisoned in a fairy-tale castle deep in the mountains of Bavaria.

The castle walls seem impossible to breach, and Strang and his fellow prisoners suffer weeks of intense interrogation before managing to plan an escape through the sewers.

Will Strang manage to escape to freedom?

Or will he have to fight to win One Man’s War?

‘One Man’s War’ is a classic First World War novel about one man’s struggle for survival against the odds.

‘One of the more significant war novels to have been written since Catch 22’ - Times Literary Supplement

‘It is an agonising book, but the agony is distanced…by attention to detail which sees right through the surface of events to their unconscious significance in the human psyche.’ The Guardian

Paul Strathern is a British writer and academic. He was born in London, and studied at Trinity College, Dublin, after which he served in the Merchant Navy over a period of two years. His best-selling history books include ‘The Medici: Godfathers of the Renaissance’, ‘Napoleon in Egypt’, and ‘The Artist, the Philosopher and the Warrior: Leonardo, Machiavelli and Borgia - a fateful collusion’.

Endeavour Press is the UKs leading independent publisher of digital books.
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Published 29.11.2018

Old Man's War book review

One Man's War: A Novel [P. M. Kippert] on scopenitout.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. One Man's War is a gripping novel that follows the journey of one.
Paul Strathern

One Man's War

Thank you! In this episodic novel of World War II, a young American soldier stationed in Italy fights in the Battle of Anzio and observes a host of quiet horrors along the way. It intersperses tense scenes of combat with lighter scenes of Kafak and his peers and occasionally moves away from the front lines entirely. Each time was the first time, sort of. All over again. Throughout, a balance is achieved between the absurd and the harrowing. There was a problem adding your email address.

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Other editions. Enlarge cover.

Please note that ebooks are subject to tax and the final price may vary depending on your country of residence. In the summer of , he sat down to write a memoir of that time, now more than 70 years ago. The result is an engaging and often humorous account of his wartime service in the Royal Navy, from just prior to joining up until his demobilisation and subsequent return to civilian life.
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John Perry did two things on his 75th birthday. First, he visited his wife's grave. Then he joined the army. The good news is that humanity finally made it into interstellar space. The bad news is that planets fit to live on are scarce-- and alien races willing to fight us for them are common. So: we fight.

His wife has been dead for a while now, he has said goodbye to the rest of his family and friends, and he is ready to leave Earth to go fight aliens on the other side of the universe. There is a lot speculation as to why the CDF only recruits people who reach 75 years of age; do they refurbish your body so that your experienced brain can make better use of it, is it population and resource control, or will you just be cannon fodder? One of the things I think Scalzi communicates well in this story is the sense of scale. This universe feels enormous, the beanstalk is impressive, the space stations seem enormous, and the space battles feel so panoramic. The science is also made to seem very impressive and out of reach, with Scalzi being deliberately vague as to the specifics of how things work, but very detailed in how valuable the outputs of these sciency things are. In contrast to that, Scalzi is able to zoom in tightly on characters for ground skirmishes, making everything seems very small and close with little room to move.

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