A shark going inland is my chief

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a shark going inland is my chief

A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief: The Island Civilization of Ancient Hawaii by Patrick Vinton Kirch

Tracing the origins of the Hawaiians and other Polynesians back to the shores of the South China Sea, archaeologist Patrick Vinton Kirch follows their voyages of discovery across the Pacific in this fascinating history of Hawaiian culture from about one thousand years ago. Combining more than four decades of his own research with Native Hawaiian oral traditions and the evidence of archaeology, Kirch puts a human face on the gradual rise to power of the Hawaiian god-kings, who by the late eighteenth century were locked in a series of wars for ultimate control of the entire archipelago.

This lively, accessible chronicle works back from Captain James Cook’s encounter with the pristine kingdom in 1778, when the British explorers encountered an island civilization governed by rulers who could not be gazed upon by common people. Interweaving anecdotes from his own widespread travel and extensive archaeological investigations into the broader historical narrative, Kirch shows how the early Polynesian settlers of Hawaii adapted to this new island landscape and created highly productive agricultural systems.

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A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief

This lively, accessible chronicle works back from Captain James Cook's encounter with the pristine kingdom in , when the British explorers encountered an island civilization governed by rulers who could not be gazed upon by common people. Interweaving anecdotes from his own widespread travel and extensive archaeological investigations into the broader historical narrative, Kirch shows how the early Polynesian settlers of Hawai'i adapted to this new island landscape and created highly productive agricultural systems. It is astonishing that Polynesian explorers in double-hulled canoes—lashed together with coconut fiber and propelled by sails of woven mats—discovered and settled these islands roughly a thousand years ago. They came upon a verdant island chain with a subtropical climate, rich soils, and abundant natural resources. Nurtured by this salubrious environment, their descendants multiplied, founding an island civilization that remained unknown to the rest of the world.

A Shark Going Inland Is My Chief and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Tracing the origins of the Hawaiians and other Polynesians back to the shores of the South China Sea, archaeologist Patrick Vinton Kirch follows their voyages of discovery across the.
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But why a review of an archaeology book in an oral history journal? The oral history in this volume is multifaceted, though the words oral history never appear. First, Kirch lays out Most users should sign in with their email address. If you originally registered with a username please use that to sign in.

Tracing the origins of the Hawaiians and other Polynesians back to the shores of the South China Sea, archaeologist Patrick Vinton Kirch follows their voyages of discovery across the Pacific in this fascinating history of Hawaiian culture from about one thousand years ago. Combining more than four decades of his own research with Native Hawaiian oral traditions and the evidence of archaeology, Kirch puts a human face on the gradual rise to power of the Hawaiian god-kings, who by the late eighteenth century were locked in a series of wars for ultimate control of the entire archipelago. This lively, accessible chronicle works back from Captain James Cook's encounter with the pristine kingdom in , when the British explorers encountered an island civilization governed by rulers who could not be gazed upon by common people. Interweaving anecdotes from his own widespread travel and extensive archaeological investigations into the broader historical narrative, Kirch shows how the early Polynesian settlers of Hawai'i adapted to this new island landscape and created highly productive agricultural systems. Sign up for free!

Patrick Vinton Kirch. Tracing the origins of the Hawaiians and other Polynesians back to the shores of the South China Sea, archaeologist Patrick Vinton Kirch follows their voyages of discovery across the Pacific in this fascinating history of Hawaiian culture from about one thousand years ago. Combining more than four decades of his own research with Native Hawaiian oral traditions and the evidence of archaeology, Kirch puts a human face on the gradual rise to power of the Hawaiian god-kings, who by the late eighteenth century were locked in a series of wars for ultimate control of the entire archipelago. Interweaving anecdotes from his own widespread travel and extensive archaeological investigations into the broader historical narrative, Kirch shows how the early Polynesian settlers of Hawai'i adapted to this new island landscape and created highly productive agricultural systems. In Peles Islands. The Reign of the Feathered Gods.

3 COMMENTS

  1. Christine P. says:

    After a discussion of the role of archaeology in reconstructing the past, Kirch explains early settlement patterns in the islands.

  2. Archard R. says:

    Our Frequent Buyer Card

  3. Verona C. says:

    Signed by the Author

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